Epigenetics And Addiction

By Ken Niemann Important controls in the switching on and off of genes include but are not limited to: timing, gravity, spatial organization, environmental cues, and epigenetic mechanisms. It is the latter that we are exploring here. Epigenetics may be defined as changes in gene expression that don’t involve changes to the DNA sequence. It…

Recommended Reading in Cognitive Science

  On the use and abuse of Bayesian modeling Bayesian Fundamentalism or Enlightenment? Is this a unified theory of the brain? Why Bayesian Rationality Is Empty, Perfect Rationality Doesn’t Exist, Ecological Rationality Is Too Simple, and Critical Rationality Does the Job Whatever Next? Predictive Brains, Situated Agents, and the Future of Cognitive Science. Free-energy and…

Philosophical Problem with the Brain Disease Model of Addiction: Epiphenomenalism

The essay below so perfectly articulates my view on epiphenomenalism and its importance to psychology that I couldn’t resist sharing it. (Epiphenomenalism is a self-referentially refuting concept.) Please give Steven Slate some traffic if you are interested in either Philosophy of Mind or Addiction: “Behaviorists believe that materialist determinism is the correct, objective scientific approach…

On the Philosophy of Recovery Part II: The Logos

By Ken Niemann “You’ve got to understand that a seagull is an unlimited idea of freedom, an image of the Great Gull…You have the freedom to be yourself, your true self, here and now, and nothing can stand in your way.” ~Jonathan Livingston Seagu I wish to follow up on a highly truncated article I…

On the Philosophy of Recovery: Reason, Meaning, & Logotherapy

By Ken Niemann Viennese Psychiatrist and Holocaust Survivor Viktor Frankl brilliantly understood the necessity of meaning and value in one’s life for mental health but was largely confused over how that might be grounded. He states: “Under the influence of a world which no longer recognized the value of human life and human dignity which…

‘Spiritual’ people at higher risk of mental health problems

  ‘Spiritual’ people at higher risk of mental health problems “They are more likely to suffer from a range of mental health problems than either the conventionally religious or those who are agnostic or atheists, found researchers at University College London. They are more disposed towards anxiety disorders, phobias and neuroses, have eating disorders and…